In the cloud there is nothing more important than customer trust. Without customer trust, a cloud business can’t succeed. When you are taking care of someone else’s assets, you have to treat those assets as more important than your own. Security has to be rock solid and absolutely unassailable. Data loss or data corruption has to be close to impossible and incredibly rare. And all commitments to customers have to be respected through business changes. These are hard standards to meet but, without success against these standards, a cloud service will always fail. Customers can leave any time and, if they have to leave, they will remember you did this to them.

These are facts and anyone working in cloud services labors under these requirements every day. It’s almost reflexive and nearly second nature. What brought this up for me over the weekend was a note I got from one of my cloud service providers. It emphasized that it really is worth talking more about customer trust.

Let’s start with some history. Many years ago, Michael Merhej and Tom Klienpeter started a company called ByteTaxi that eventually offered a product called Foldershare. It was a simple service with a simple UI but it did peer-to-peer file sync incredibly well, it did it through firewalls, it did it without install confusion and, well, it just worked. It was a simple service but was well executed and very useful. In 2005, Microsoft acquired Foldershare and continued to offer the service. It didn’t get enhanced much for years but it remained useful. Then Microsoft came up with a broader plan called Windows Live Mesh and the Foldershare service was renamed. Actually the core peer-to-peer functionality passed through an array of names and implementations from Foldershare, Windows Live Foldershare, Windows Live Sync and finally Windows Live Mesh.

During the early days at Microsoft, it was virtually uncared for and had little developer attention. As new names and implementations were announced and the feature actually had developer attention, it was getting enhanced but, ironically, it was also getting somewhat harder to use and definitely less stable. But, it still worked and the functionality lived on in Live Mesh. Microsoft has another service called Skydrive that does the same thing that all the other cloud sync services do: sync files to cloud hosted storage. Unfortunately, it doesn’t include the core peer-to-peer functionality of Live Mesh. Reportedly 40% of the Live Mesh users also use Skydrive.

This is where we get back to customer trust. Over the weekend, Microsoft sent out a note to all Mesh users confirming it will be shut off next month as a follow up to their announcement that the service will be killed that went out in December. They explained the reason to terminate the service and remove the peer-to-peer file sync functionality:

Currently 40% of Mesh customers are actively using SkyDrive and based on the positive response and our increasing focus on improving personal cloud storage, it makes sense to merge SkyDrive and Mesh into a single product for anytime and anywhere access for files.

Live Mesh is being killed without a replacement service. It’s not a big deal but 2 months isn’t a lot of warning. I know that this sort of thing can happen to small startups anytime and, at any time, customers could get left unsupported. But, Microsoft seems well beyond the startup phase at this point. I get that strategic decisions have to be made but there are times when I wonder how much thought went into the decision. I suspect it was something like “there are only 3 million Live Mesh customers so it’s really not worth continuing with it.” And, it actually may not be worth continuing the service. But, there is this customer trust thing. And I just hate to see it violated – it’s bad for all cloud provider when anyone in the industry makes a decision that raises the customer trust question.

Fortunately, there is a Mesh replacement service: I’ve been using it since the early days when it was in controlled beta. Over the last month or so Cubby has moved to full, unrestricted production. It’s been solid for the period I’ve been using it and, like Foldershare, its simple and it works. I really like it. If you are a Mesh user, were a Foldershare user, or just would like to be able to sync your files between your different systems, try Cubby. Cubby also add support for Android or IOS devices without extra cost. Cubby is well executed and stable.

It must be Cloud Cleaning week at Microsoft. A friend forwarded the note sent to the millions of active Microsoft Messenger customers this month: the service is being “retired” and users are recommended to consider Skype.

If you are interested in reading more on the Live Mesh service elimination, the following is the text of the note sent to all current Mesh users:

Dear Mesh customer,

Recently we released the latest version of SkyDrive, which you can use to:

  • Choose the files and folders on your SkyDrive that sync on each computer.
  • Access your SkyDrive using a brand new app for Android v2.3 or the updated apps for Windows Phone, iPhone, and iPad.
  • Collaborate online with the new Office Web apps, including Excel forms, co-authoring in PowerPoint and embeddable Word documents.

Currently 40% of Mesh customers are actively using SkyDrive and based on the positive response and our increasing focus on improving personal cloud storage, it makes sense to merge SkyDrive and Mesh into a single product for anytime and anywhere access for files. As a result, we will retire Mesh on February 13, 2013. After this date, some Mesh functions, such as remote desktop and peer to peer sync, will no longer be available and any data on the Mesh cloud, called Mesh synced storage or SkyDrive synced storage, will be removed. The folders you synced with Mesh will stop syncing, and you will not be able to connect to your PCs remotely using Mesh.

We encourage you to try out the new SkyDrive to see how it can meet your needs. During the transition period, we suggest that, in addition to using Mesh, you sync your Mesh files using SkyDrive. This way, you can try out SkyDrive without changing your existing Mesh setup. For tips on transitioning to SkyDrive, see SkyDrive for Mesh users on the Windows website. If you have questions, you can post them in the SkyDrive forums.

Mesh customers have been influential and your feedback has helped shape our strategy for Mesh and SkyDrive. We would not be here without your support and hope you continue to give us feedback as you use SkyDrive.


The Windows Live Mesh and SkyDrive teams

There is real danger of thinking of customers as faceless aggregations of hundreds of thousands or even millions of users. We need to think through decisions one user at a time and make it work for them individually. If millions of active users are on Microsoft Messenger, what would it take to make them want to use Skype? If 60% of the Windows Live Mesh users chose not to use Microsoft Skydrive, why is that? Considering customers one at a time is clearly the right thing for customers but, long haul, it’s also the right thing for the business. It builds the most important asset in the cloud, customer trust.


James Hamilton
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